Communicate With Your Kids

My Family

October is National Communicate with Your Kid Month. Conversation flows naturally when adults and children are doing creative activities. Arts and crafts projects like these help your kids open up, express their thoughts and feelings and share their dreams, fears, and memories!

Share Ideas with Art and Writing

Everybody has a personal style of communicating with words and illustrations. Get kids into the habit of writing and drawing as a window into their minds and to pave the way for heart-to-heart talks.

Family StoriesRecord family stories.
Capture lasting memories in family memory books. 'Remember when we...?' prompts children to enthusiastically recall when the new baby came home or Grandpa's special bedtime stories. With Crayola® Colored Pencils, write down young children's words for them as they talk. Older kids and adults write their own memories. Illustrate with Crayola® Gel FX Crayons. What a keepsake!

Start a JournalStart a Family Journal.
Daily records of family life help you keep track of events and cute sayings that otherwise tend to fade from memory. Use Crayola® Washable Kid's Paint to paint a journal cover. Punch holes, thread yarn through notebook paper, and you have a one-of-a-kind family journal. Family members write or sketch their daily highlights with Crayola® markers or colored pencils.

Surprise notesWrite surprise notes.
Tuck a friendly Crayola® Gel Pen note inside the kids' lunch boxes, pockets, or book bags. Writing notes with cool pens becomes a fun habit that builds literacy skills and motivates kids to express their thoughts and feelings. You may be surprised by the clever, thoughtful notes they leave for you - in surprising places, too!

Thank youSay thank you.
Writing thank-you notes is a valuable social skill that children of all ages can learn. After every gift or special act of kindness, urge children to write their sentiments and address envelopes using Crayola® Colored Pencils. Scribbles or a drawing from a toddler is just as treasured as a formal note from an older child.