Run for Office!

Why

Run for office! Discuss the characteristics that are important for leaders to have. Design a poster showcasing the qualities you have that would win you votes in the next election!


Steps

1. Elections are important events in society. They give people the opportunity to voice their opinions and have a say in decisions being made. Elections also give leaders a chance to shine. During elections, candidates can campaign to win the hearts and votes of the people. What qualities do you think leaders should posses? Does the leader of your student council need to have the same skills and characteristics as the leader of a country?


2. Make a list of elections familiar to your class. What school clubs hold annual elections? What elections are there in your town? Discuss the qualities that you think are important for the candidates to portray in each of these elections. Look at examples of campaign posters with your class. What do the candidates focus on in these posters?


3. What elected position do you think is a good fit for you? Would you like to be Treasurer of your school’s Honor’s Society? Perhaps you dream of one day running for President of the United States!


4. Design a campaign poster of your own! Highlight the qualities you possess that would make you the best candidate for the job. On a piece of poster board or oak tag, use Crayola® Metallic Colored Pencils to illustrate words and symbols that represent you in the campaign. Be sure to include your name so voters will know who to choose. For extra eye-catching sparkle, use Crayola Metallic FX Crayons and Crayola Glitter Crayons to add color and a decorative border to the poster.


5. Display your poster for the entire class to enjoy!


Safety Guidelines

Adult supervision is required for any arts & crafts project. Observe children closely and intervene as necessary to prevent potential safety problems and ensure appropriate use of arts and crafts materials. Some craft items, particularly beads and buttons, are potential choking hazards for young children. Avoid use of such small parts with children younger than 3 years. Craft items such as scissors, push pins and chenille sticks may have sharp points or edges. Avoid use of materials with sharp points by children younger than 4 years. Read all manufacturers' safety warnings before using arts and craft supplies.

Adaptations

  • Share your campaign poster with the class. What is the most common leadership quality advertised on the posters? What qualities do you see that are unique to only a few classmates? Which posters do you think represent the candidates best? Which poster would win the candidate your vote?
  • Create a campaign to elect a class mascot! Choose a mascot that you think best represents the dynamic and unique qualities of your class and design a poster to win your mascot votes. Display all the posters for the class view and cast votes to select the new mascot.
  • Younger students and those with special needs may benefit from meeting with an elected leader. Invite the town mayor or another elected official to visit the class for an interview. As a class, prepare questions to discuss with your guest. Encourage the students to talk about the process of campaigning and being in an election.

Related Lesson Plans

Lesson Plans

Share on Facebook

Supplies

crayola supplies
  • Glitter Crayons
  • Metallic Colored Pencils
  • Metallic FX Crayons
household supplies
  • oak tag or poster board

Overview

grades

  • Grades 4 to 6
  • Grades 7 to 12
  • Special Needs

subjects

  • Social Studies
  • Visual Arts

time

  • 30 to 60 minutes

benefits

  • Students discuss a variety of local and national elections.

  • Students recognize leadership qualities and identify which qualities are best suited for specific leadership roles.

  • Students identify what personal qualities they possess that would be an asset to them in an election campaign.

  • Students create campaign posters to advertise their leadership skills to voters.

Cirriculum

Research Canada Standards
Research UK Standards
Research U.S. Standards